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Just Released! Andrew Jackson and the Young in Heart, A Romance for All Time

30 Jan

By Wilbur Cross. Available from iUniverse Books: http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000140311  and from Amazon Books: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Jackson-Young-Heart-Romance/dp/1440177201/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1268254216&sr=8-1

When Andrew Jackson, newly elected as President of the United States, moved on horseback to Washington and settlement in the White House, it was with an immense sense of loneliness, following the death of his beloved wife, Rachel. But the situation changed for the better when he invited young people who themselves were facing loneliness or a sense of failure in life, to join him there and take up activities that would revive their spirits and offer meaningful jobs and social assignments. This delightful novel is based on historical fact and offers a unique glimpse into the character and life of President Andrew Jackson.

Ageless are those who still suppose  

The rain brings petals to the rose,  

Who tolerate the winter’s fling  

Knowing it will soon be spring;  

Who see in dreams some lesson learned  

And not dark signs of passion spurned.  

What prompted them to be so clever?  

They are the Young in Heart forever.  

                         – Annie-Belle Donelson  

Excerpt: Chapter 1  

I was impetuously in love with Andrew Jackson.  

The year was 1789. He was 22. I was 16. He was like no other man in the territory of Tennessee. Or perhaps in the entire republic, from the shores of the Atlantic to the sinuous banks of the Mississippi.  

He was a shagbark type of a man, not a Tennessean by birth, but a maverick from the Carolinas. No one had ever presumed to earmark him as handsome. Indeed, his features were so etched by the whiplash of frontier life that he had more lineaments in his profile than two or three of his contemporaries put together.  

He was born to be a general, yet the military was too confining for his skills; bred to be a philosopher, yet with more energy than was traditional in the role; structured to be a pioneer, yet more polished than rough-sawn; schooled to be a lawyer, yet more accomplished dealing with broad patterns than with the details of warp and woof.  

Excerpt: Chapter 2  

 “Why in Heaven’s name,” said my mother one day with uncharacteristic exasperation “would that young man, Andrew Jackson, risk his career not to mention his reputation and probably brilliant future by going after Rachel?”  

“He is contorting himself into the most unlucky, contradictory love affair, fraught with all kinds of legal, moral, and emotional complications.”  

 

Statue in Jackson Square, New Orleans

Excerpt: Chapter 4

Slander was a fever that was to flare up periodically throughout the Jackson’s entire married life. It was, in fact, to contribute to the unholy tragedy that darkened Rachel’s last illness and death.  

Excerpt: Chapter 6  

“Bleed her, bleed her!”  he pleaded with Dr. Hogg.  

The operation was performed by this good man as deftly as on the previous occasion.  Barely two drops fl owed to discolor the gauze pressed against the incision. Her face was as white as the sheet on which she lay. Her beautiful dark eyes were open, staring at the ceiling as though she were a Greek statue. Dr. Hogg gently closed them with his fingers and bowed his head.  

She was buried in the garden, 150 paces from the East door of the Hermitage.  

 

Inuguration 1829

Excerpt: Chapter 13

As lovers have been doing for centuries, Becky Hays and Truxton Blair forgot their quarrels and fell into each other’s arms again with, if possible, increased ardor and rapture. Early that fall they were married in a modest ceremony in the East Room of the White House, attended only by relatives and friends, as well as the rest of the Young in Heart.  

Andrew gave the bride away.  He looked taller, younger, and livelier than he had since the day he was inaugurated!  

I was still in love with Andrew Jackson. I guessed I always would be.

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Posted by on January 30, 2010 in Books

 

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